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Poster: lobster12 Date: Jun 6, 2011 10:35am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The last of the 'very good' Grateful Dead shows

The standing on the moon is. I think the rest of my review is pretty consistent. Like I said, it's that guitar. Never a big fan

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Poster: dark.starz Date: Jun 7, 2011 4:56am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The last of the 'very good' Grateful Dead shows

As previously stated, it's like wine and it all boils down to ones musical taste. Jerry's artistic & musical evolution was always impressive to these eyes & ears in every aspect over the four decades.

The one little trick of his that always blew my mind was his ability to go from strumming with a pick, tuck the pick inbetween his ring and little finger, finger pick with three fingers for a stretch, then bring the pick back up and shred!



This post was modified by dark.starz on 2011-06-07 11:56:57

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Poster: lobster12 Date: Jun 6, 2011 11:29am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The last of the 'very good' Grateful Dead shows

I see the drop off on certain songs. I'm a big Stagger lee guy and love the jam toward the end. Once Jerry switched guitars I noticed it didn't pack as much punch as it did before. The word "tinny" gets used a lot to describe and I wouldn't argue. It's all in ones taste I guess. I didn't like it but it supposedly was jerry's "dream guitar". Go figure.

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Poster: dark.starz Date: Jun 6, 2011 6:33pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The last of the 'very good' Grateful Dead shows

To my humble ears as the resolving power of the sound system increased so did the separation of the layers between Jerry and the keyboard, Bob, Phil & Drumz.

In terms of the music well it's anybody's guess. I mean if you go back as far as Louis Armstong in the 20's then proceed forward through the "big band" sound of the 40's the classic jazz, blues & Elvis period of the 50's into the folk period of the early 60's across the pond and then kicked back over to Dylan plugging in, throughout the classic period of 1967 in America and Britian forward > throughout the Seventies up until the evening Lennon was killed in 1980, the further technology evolved, the sooner the performance declined. Reel > LP > Cass > CD > PCM > PC.

That's why having the original tape that traveled across the tape head "in those days" is crucial. To get the proper balance between the middle, top and bottom end.